January 17, 2019

LCIC 2019 Winter Film Festival

January 17th: The City Dark
Not Rated.
Showing at 4:00 & 7:00 p.m. at the Lewis and Clark Interpretive Center. Runtime is 1 hour, 23 minutes.
Donations of non-perishable food items to the local food bank are encouraged.

Is darkness becoming extinct? When filmmaker Ian Cheney moves from rural Maine to New York City and discovers streets awash in light and skies devoid of stars, he embarks on a journey to America's brightest and darkest corners, asking astronomers, cancer researchers and ecologists what is lost in the glare of city lights. Blending a humorous, searching narrative with poetic footage of the night sky, The City Dark provides a fascinating introduction to the science of the dark and an exploration of our relationship to the stars. Winner, Best Score/Music Award, 2011 SXSW Film Festival. Produced in association with American Documentary.

January 24th: Christmas in Yellowstone
Not rated.
Showing at 4:00 & 7:00 p.m. at the Lewis and Clark Interpretive Center. Runtime is 60 minutes.
Donations of non-perishable food items to the local food bank are encouraged.

As snow falls and Christmas lights glow in Jackson Hole, Wyoming, a holiday season of a different sort settles over the great winter world of Yellowstone, America's first national park and one of the greatest expanses of unspoiled nature and wildlife anywhere on Earth. Breathtaking landscapes frame intimate scenes as Yellowstone's diverse animal residents make their way through the most challenging season of the year, when nature's inhospitality is matched only by its serenity.

January 31st: Rise of the Superstorms
Rated PG.
Showing at 4:00 & 7:00 p.m. at the Lewis and Clark Interpretive Center. Runtime is 60 minutes.
Donations of non-perishable food items to the local food bank are encouraged.

In just one 2017 season Houston, Florida, and the Caribbean were changed forever. Three hurricanes swept in from the Atlantic one after another, shattering storm records and killing hundreds of people. First, Harvey brought catastrophic rain and flooding to Houston, causing $125 billion in damage. Less than two weeks later, Irma lashed the Caribbean with 185 mile per hour winds - and left the island of Barbuda uninhabitable. Hot on Irma's heels, Maria intensified from a Category 1 to a Category 5 hurricane in just 15 hours, then ravaged Puerto Rico and left millions of people without power. As the planet warms, are these superstorms the new normal? And as the U.S. faces the next hurricane season, does it need to prepare for the reality of climate refugees? NOVA takes you inside the 2017 superstorms and the cutting-edge research that will determine how well equipped we are to deal with hurricanes in the future.

February 7th: Fox Tales
Not rated.
Showing at 4:00 & 7:00 p.m. at the Lewis and Clark Interpretive Center. Runtime is 60 minutes.
Donations of non-perishable food items to the local food bank are encouraged.

On a high ridge in Newfoundland, Canada, nestled between the Atlantic Ocean and the borders of an old grove forest, a Red fox, the matron of her family group, gives birth yet again. Follow the pups as they grow and learn to hunt, adapt, and survive. Explore the family dynamic of these clever creatures as bonds are formed. But the vixen knows that not all her cubs will inherit these tall trees, crystal lakes, and the ocean spray. Before the snows come again, she will have to banish some of her offspring for the good of the family. We also hear from scientists in Madison, Wisconsin and Bristol, England, about their studies on urban Red foxes who are facing a much different challenge than their Canadian counterparts. And another scientist tracks how Red foxes are moving out to the Arctic tundra and surviving in one of the harshest landscapes.

February 14th: Death Dive to Saturn
Rated G.
Showing at 4:00 & 7:00 p.m. at the Lewis and Clark Interpretive Center. Runtime is 60 minutes.
Donations of non-perishable food items to the local food bank are encouraged.

Almost everything we know today about the beautiful giant ringed planet comes from Cassini, the NASA mission that launched in 1997 and arrived at Saturn in 2004. Since then, the space probe has been beaming home miraculous images and scientific data, revealing countless wonders about the planet, its rings and 62 moons - including some that could harbor life. As the mission approaches its final days in 2017, it attempts one last set of daring maneuvers - diving between the innermost ring and the top of Saturn's atmosphere. Aiming to skim less than 2000 miles above the cloud tops, no spacecraft has ever gone so close to Saturn, and hopes are high for incredible observations that could solve major mysteries about the planet's core. But such a daring maneuver comes with many risks and is no slam dunk. In fact, slamming into rocks in the rings is a real possibility. Join NASA engineers for the tense and triumphant moments as they find out if their bold re-programming has worked, and discover the wonders that Cassini has revealed over the years.